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Council inducts 45 foreign trained laboratory scientists

The Medical Laboratory Science Council of Nigeria (MLSCN) has inducted 45 foreign graduates of Medical Laboratory Science.
Mr Tosan Erhabor, Acting Registrar of the council while inducting the professionals in Abuja said the graduands were inducted having scaled through the seven months pre-qualification training and examination.
Erhabor, who described the induction as third in the series noted that no fewer than 179 foreign trained scientists have so far been inducted by the council since the commencement of the pre-qualification training programme and examination.
While congratulating the inductees for their success Erhabor described them as the future of the profession.
He, however, urged them to brace up for the challenges ahead in order to move the profession to an enviable height.
“In spite of how profound or robust your training or the pedigree of your training or sophistication of training apparatus, MLSCN still owed it a duty to ensure you went through the process of adaptation, and integration as part of prerequisite for licensure.
“Act 11, 2003 Section 4a empowers the council to determine from time to time the standard of knowledge and skills to be attained by persons seeking to become medical laboratory scientists, medical laboratory technicians and medical laboratory assistants.
“Section 4 empowers it to assess, evaluate and register foreign graduates of Medical Laboratory Science,” Erhabor noted.
Erhabor tasked the inductees of ideal teamwork, efficiency, dedication, due process among other elements that would ensure international best practices.
He reminded them that the council had zero tolerance to all forms of professional misconducts adding that such could bring disrepute to the profession and cherished families.
Erhabor said: “The profession needs your services at every level of healthcare delivery and you must profitably harness your full potentials as young scientists.
“It is expected of you to bring ideal teamwork, efficiency, dedication, adherence to due process, respect for self and others; and other elements of international best practices as you have imbibed in the course of your training overseas.
“If you are unable to make a difference through exemplary conduct, you would be contributing to the sad narrative of those who failed to live up to their full potentials,”
One of the inductees, Oyinloye Olayemi, who spoke on behalf of the inductees, thanked the Almighty God and the council for deeming them fit for the induction.
She further appreciated their parents for investing in their academic pursuit in order for them to actualise their dreams and aspirations. (NAN)
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